Chavín de Huántar: Integrating Art, Innovation, and Politics in the Early Andes

26th Annual Elizabeth and Lewis K. Land Memorial Lecture: 

Chavín de Huántar: Integrating Art, Innovation, and Politics in the Early Andes
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– Dr. John Rick

Saturday, December 13, 2014 (10:00 AM – 12 noon)
Koret Auditorium, de Young Museum

Chavín de Huántar, the best-known site from the Formative Period (1800 – 1 BCE) in the Peruvian Andes, produced distinctive and enigmatic art works that incorporate many materials and that have been used by archaeologists to trace the apparent influence of Chavín styles throughout the region. A rarely explored aspect is how this art can be seen as part of a complex of innovations, developed at Chavín and other contemporary sites, that were part of a calculated strategy for establishing the authority of early leaders. Incorporating recent discoveries at Chavín, this lecture will emphasize how developments in art, ritual, architecture, and technology built a new political world, one that would be the foundation for later societies such as the Moche and Inca.

Dr. John W. Rick has been teaching archaeology in the Anthropology Department at Stanford University since 1978, and directing the Chavín de Huántar Archaeological Project since 1995. He has carried out research in the Andes for forty years and is also involved in the archaeology of the Guatemala highlands. His interests in this field include employing digital archaeological techniques and researching the beginnings of stratification in New World societies, stone tool technologies, and all things Peruvian.